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Elk
November 15th 2008, 02:10 PM
OK, I really feel frustrated because I am trying to purchase ASM 4th Edition. The 5th Edition is being released 12/10. I want to get started now. As far as I can tell, none of the online bookstores are selling the 4th Edition right now. My only option is to try and track down someone selling it secondhand. I feel a bit wary, though, of sending a check or money order to someone I don't know. Does anyone have any suggestions?

chicken_po_boy
November 15th 2008, 03:37 PM
My advice would be to wait for the 5th edition. The 4th had a ton of errata that should be fixed in the 5th. If you want to get a jump start before Dec 15, you could start reading some of the DM chapters.

Elk
November 15th 2008, 04:56 PM
Thanks. I'm just kind of torn. For some reason I feel like I really NEED the ASM Manual. I'm just a freak, I guess. Frantic, frustrated with my life....Maybe I just need a psychiatrist. :Dizzy:

yorklee44
November 15th 2008, 05:29 PM
My advice is to not start so early. The exam isn't til mid-May. We're still 6 months out. I didn't start studying for the Fall exam until September and I was able to go through the whole manual once in a month's time. I got 15/19 on PAK. Waiting for the newest edition of ASM is worth it because it'll have the latest info in it. I had to study the 3rd Edition along with the Supplement and even then I found out later that there was stuff in the 4th Edition that was helpful but I didn't have access to it. If you really want to start studying this early, I suggest taking a look at the textbook first and get your feet wet...

Bolyai
November 15th 2008, 09:15 PM
I agree with the other posters who say to wait. There are several small changes to the syllabus that will be reflected by the 5th edition, plus as others have mentioned a lot of 4th edition errata that will be corrected in the new edition. Besides, MFE is not that big of an exam, unlike MLC or C, so if you start in December you'll still have plenty of time to get ready for Spring.

Elk
November 17th 2008, 12:38 AM
Thanks for all the advice! This site has really helped me.

As far as waiting....you don't know who you're dealing with here. I have to work really, really, hard to pass these exams. In addition, I am a single mother of two school age boys. I never know when I'm going to have time to study. And, even if I have a large chunk of time...it's hard for me to absorb a lot at once....I need to take frequent breaks.

I've purchased a 4th edition second hand-it should arrive soon. I'm going to purchase the 5th edition when it comes out. My work will help me pay for that. I don't want to take any chances here. If I can pass MFE in the Spring it will be a huge deal for me.

NoMoreExams
November 17th 2008, 01:01 AM
Thanks for all the advice! This site has really helped me.

As far as waiting....you don't know who you're dealing with here. I have to work really, really, hard to pass these exams. In addition, I am a single mother of two school age boys. I never know when I'm going to have time to study. And, even if I have a large chunk of time...it's hard for me to absorb a lot at once....I need to take frequent breaks.

I've purchased a 4th edition second hand-it should arrive soon. I'm going to purchase the 5th edition when it comes out. My work will help me pay for that. I don't want to take any chances here. If I can pass MFE in the Spring it will be a huge deal for me.

Geeeez. Exams are hard, studying while having to take of kids is harder, I can't imagine what it's like as a single mother. Best of luck!

Elk
November 17th 2008, 01:41 PM
Thanks a bunch! They actually keep me motivated a good deal of the time. I kinda have it in the back of my head that my 11 year old will become an actuary. He has the aptitude. I just want to be in a postion where I can help him get started if he needs it when the time comes.

Of course, if he chooses something else, that's cool, too.

Bolyai
November 18th 2008, 07:43 AM
Thanks a bunch! They actually keep me motivated a good deal of the time. I kinda have it in the back of my head that my 11 year old will become an actuary. He has the aptitude. I just want to be in a postion where I can help him get started if he needs it when the time comes.

Of course, if he chooses something else, that's cool, too.

I also highly recommend that you obtain a copy of the DM textbook and read it carefully.

bayoubelle
November 18th 2008, 08:19 AM
Im sorry, but I personally think that the dm book is a waste of time. If, perhaps, you wanted to skim through it to make certain that they didnt leave any of the more obscure stuff out of the manuals, then I could second that. However, I seriously doubt that you will get better practice than ASM.

Bolyai
November 18th 2008, 07:49 PM
Im sorry, but I personally think that the dm book is a waste of time. If, perhaps, you wanted to skim through it to make certain that they didnt leave any of the more obscure stuff out of the manuals, then I could second that. However, I seriously doubt that you will get better practice than ASM.

I wouldn't say that. Except for the material in Chapter 24 (there's some much errata in that chapter it's silly), the material is explained very well. Also, because the exam is still fairly new, many exam questions are lifted straight out of the examples in the book and the exercises at the end of the chapters. Case in point - I thoroughly read the relevant DM material for both FM and MFE, and did most of the problems at the end of each chapter (in addition to using ASM), and I'm pretty sure I got every question right on the material from DM on those two exams. ASM is more valuable than the text in preparing for the exam, but I firmly believe that reading DM gives you an extra edge.

Elk
November 19th 2008, 04:36 PM
Thanks, I ended up reading the DM book for FM and it really helped. At least for now it seems to make sense and helps me to understand the concepts.

bayoubelle
November 20th 2008, 10:48 PM
I read the dm book for FM. It was almost exactly the same material as was in ASM DM section. As for MFE, I glanced over - spent most of my time with ASM and Mahler and so far, I've scored pretty high on the PAK. If you already have the book, it doesnt hurt to use it, but I still wouldnt spend any significant time on it.

Elk
November 21st 2008, 12:38 AM
Well, for now ASM is my exam bible and DM just to fill in the gaps. I got my 4th edition ASM in the mail today!

Bolyai
November 21st 2008, 07:52 AM
For MFE, I think it's more important to understand the concepts than for other exams, and that's where the textbook comes in handy, since it does a great job of explaining the concepts. Study manuals are not intended to replace the text, but to supplement it and provide lots of practice problems.

yorklee44
November 21st 2008, 12:13 PM
For MFE, I think it's more important to understand the concepts than for other exams, and that's where the textbook comes in handy, since it does a great job of explaining the concepts. Study manuals are not intended to replace the text, but to supplement it and provide lots of practice problems.

Sorry, but I'd have to disagree. When I was studying for FM, the Broverman book was really complicated to say the least. The way they wrote the formulas and explained things were so dragged out and unorganized and convoluted, I didn't understand what I was reading. Similar thing with Derivatives Market. I ended up feeling like I was a zombie and just reading Greek when I went through them. Then I decided to just stick with the study manuals and that made a lot more sense to me. I passed FM with the use of ACTEX, and I have a very good chance of passing MFE with ASM in my first sitting, no thanks to the textbooks.

Bolyai
November 21st 2008, 06:40 PM
Sorry, but I'd have to disagree. When I was studying for FM, the Broverman book was really complicated to say the least. The way they wrote the formulas and explained things were so dragged out and unorganized and convoluted, I didn't understand what I was reading. Similar thing with Derivatives Market. I ended up feeling like I was a zombie and just reading Greek when I went through them. Then I decided to just stick with the study manuals and that made a lot more sense to me. I passed FM with the use of ACTEX, and I have a very good chance of passing MFE with ASM in my first sitting, no thanks to the textbooks.

Yeah, regarding FM, that's why I wrote "For MFE, I think it's more important to understand the concepts than for other exams." For FM I didn't use the textbooks either, except for the derivatives material. The calculations for MFE are not that complicated, but the concepts are much more advanced than for FM. The MFE material is typically a topic that is not covered in undergraduate programs, but in grad school. The DM textbook is good and goes into more depth than the study manual. It's not that you can't pass without reading it, but I think it's a big help.