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ramjom
March 7th 2006, 01:17 PM
I have taken all Calculus courses, but I want to review it. I know a fundamental knowledge in Calculus is a must for Exam P. I would go through the whole Calculus book, but that would be time consuming. What topics are required for Exam P (to tackle the Prob. exercises)?

I was thinking:

-Techniques of Differentiation
-Techniques of Integration
-Area
-Series
-Partial Differentiation
-Double Integrals

Shirley_Schmidt
March 7th 2006, 02:15 PM
All you really need is integration tecniques. I just took P 2 wks ago and I was really glad that integration is one of my strengths. You just have to be quick. There are no hard integrals, mostly just integrating polynomials or, for example x*e^x, so you need to be good at integration by parts. That's pretty much all the calculus you need. Try the practice problems posted by the SOA. You'll see what I mean.

P.S. I definitely wouldn't go throught the whole book. Just do lot's of the probability practice questions and your calculus skills will be brushed up at the same time. If you come to a problem you can't solve( in terms of Calc), just review the material you need. And I really can't emphasize enough...practice, practice, practice. You only have 6 min to solve each problem = no time to think, just do.

ramjom
March 9th 2006, 08:29 AM
I saw the problems and they only require integration (double integrals (joint-prob) and integration by parts (simple integrals)). It would be a waste of time to go through the whole Calculus textbook. I'll go through Ross, Wackerly and the Actex manual. I appreciate the help, now it's just practice non-stop.

wat
March 9th 2006, 02:20 PM
I saw the problems and they only require integration (double integrals (joint-prob) and integration by parts (simple integrals)). It would be a waste of time to go through the whole Calculus textbook. I'll go through Ross, Wackerly and the Actex manual. I appreciate the help, now it's just practice non-stop.

The integral that Shirley_Schmidt mentioned earlier (x*e^x) can be done with a method called "tabular integration". Google will tell you what it is. It's essentially automating integration-by-parts.

ramjom
March 10th 2006, 07:13 AM
I was using the textbook Calculus by Earl W. Swokowski, Michael Olinick, Dennis Pence, Jeffery A. Cole; and didn't find tabular integration by parts there. On the other hand, I found tabular integration by parts in the textbook Calculus and Analytic Geometry by George B., Jr Thomas, Ross L. Finney. The technique makes integration by parts a breeze, thanks for the advice.

bdenyer
March 12th 2006, 11:35 PM
Also you should be proficient at differentiation as well. It showed up frequently on the Feb. exam with moment generating functions. Good luck!

kekiabakia
June 16th 2008, 11:29 AM
Hi,
My name is Collins Kekia Bakia, and i'm preparing for the September Session of exam P Could you give me the full titles of the books by Ross and Wackerly

Thanks

sdmn16
June 18th 2008, 12:06 PM
I think the best way to find out how much calculus you need is by taking it on an as-needed basis. Most likely, if you've taken some calculus courses, you already have everything you need or just need to brush up a little on some of the core techniques (if you are worried, going through an old calculus syllabus and reviewing the big topics is not a bad idea). So just do what everyone seems to say on the forums: keep doing lots of practice problems.

If you can do a problem cleanly and efficiently, move on. If your answer is messy, inelegant, or wrong, look at the solution provided. For problems and solutions, I recommend TheInfiniteActuary.com, I pretty much used them as a sole resource for Exam P and found it to be all that I needed. That being said, tabular integration is really useful for integrating by parts problems, as well as learning how to do double + triple integrals.