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satyam
April 6th 2006, 05:44 PM
I know that it is important to have strong mathematics skills if you want to become an actuary. However, some of the websites that I checked said that it is also vital to have economics and computer programming skills. I want to know if you really need to be good at economics and computer programming in order to become an actuary.

I would also like to know if there are any summer opportunities (i.e. jobs, voluntary) available for high school students who want to become actuary. Any help will be appreciated.

brianritchie
April 7th 2006, 08:32 AM
I think its always better to have some skill in programming at least in Visual Basic and Microsoft Excel formulas for that matter

As for economics.. the usual Internediate Micro and Macro would serve you well but then again it could very well be an added advantage to know a little more especially becuase econs helps greatly in analysing markets and etc..

Denny Crane
April 7th 2006, 09:25 AM
I know that it is important to have strong mathematics skills if you want to become an actuary. However, some of the websites that I checked said that it is also vital to have economics and computer programming skills. I want to know if you really need to be good at economics and computer programming in order to become an actuary.

I would also like to know if there are any summer opportunities (i.e. jobs, voluntary) available for high school students who want to become actuary. Any help will be appreciated.

It might be hard to find anything actuarial related while in high school. However, anything computer related or math related might be a good stepping stone to obtaining an actuarial internship while in college.

leibniz
April 7th 2006, 09:08 PM
I'm also curious to know what kinds of programming skills are sought. You mentioned VB and Excel, but what about lower level languages like Fortran, Java, and C++? I've had beginning university classes in all three except that I've had an additional advanced class in C++. I've made programs in nonlinear optimization using MATLAB and am currently learning about Mathematica. Also, I've had some minor exposure to LISP.


I think its always better to have some skill in programming at least in Visual Basic and Microsoft Excel formulas for that matter

As for economics.. the usual Internediate Micro and Macro would serve you well but then again it could very well be an added advantage to know a little more especially becuase econs helps greatly in analysing markets and etc..

Ken
April 8th 2006, 01:37 AM
I consider VBA a low level programming language, but anyways, if you can program in one language, you can program in them all. It's just different syntax. You just need to understand and visualize the logic.

leibniz
April 8th 2006, 02:22 AM
you consider visual basic low level?? Shyea right even c++ & java are considered only mid-level. kernel for example is low level. VB is child's play by comparison. Of course that doesn't make vb any more or less useful.


I consider VBA a low level programming language, but anyways, if you can program in one language, you can program in them all. It's just different syntax. You just need to understand and visualize the logic.

Irish Blues
April 8th 2006, 09:19 AM
The question was: "what kinds of programming skills are sought?"

If you can program in one language, you can learn how to do it in any other language. It doesn't matter if your preferred language is C, C++, Java, FORTRAN, COBOL, VBA, Basic (the one with the line numbers) or HTML - the fact that you can program in one language demonstrates that you know how to write a program to solve a problem and can troubleshoot. That's what employers want to know. They don't care what language it is - they want to know that you can program adequately in some language.

If you're asking "which programming languages/programs are most useful," then I'd suggest VBA, SAS, Excel, and Access. I've yet to see or hear anyone using MATLAB or Mathematica.

dizzydevil
April 28th 2006, 02:18 PM
Right now i am learning a programming language called Delphi!!!!
IT is completely useless but i would like to ask will it make a big difference to when i use other programming languages!
(will it help me to understand other programming languages so i can become better at those easier?)

and i'm in high school but i've read in wiki that priliminary exams usually consists of mathmathics!

Would it make my life easier if i do Statisics first? graduate from that and THEN become an Actuary?

Irish Blues
April 28th 2006, 06:57 PM
The only other time I've heard Delphi mentioned as a programming language was at the place I used to work before I got into the actuarial field, and that's because it was the official company programming language. And yes, reportedly it was completely useless.

Look at my post above yours for the answer to "how will Delphi help me program in other languages." The preliminary exams are mostly mathematics, but it's not that simple. Get your calculus, matrix theory, and stats down in college and start working though the preliminary exams while you still remember how to do that stuff. Look up the info on what's on those first four exams to get an idea of what you need to know.