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AvonT
April 24th 2005, 06:30 PM
Hi there, I am a high school student and I am going to study community college in the U.S after this summer. I am interested in Math and solving problems. But I want to ask you guys some questions about Actuarial Science.

1. What should I study in Community College?
2. What should I Study when I transfer to 4 year University?
3. Which school is better for studying about Actuarial Science?
4. When should I start writing the Exam 1 and 2?

Hope you guys can help me

Thanks

AvonT

PhillyP
April 26th 2005, 06:28 PM
I would take as many econ, finance, and math courses as you can. You should definately plan on taking 2-3 semesters of calculus and atleast one class that is calculus-based probability. There are are also what is called VEE requirements and you should pick classes that will satisfy it. You can find all the info you need at this link

http://www.soa.org/ccm/content/exams-education-jobs/education-redesign/process-for-validation-by-educational-experience

That's about all i can help you with, good luck.

AvonT
April 26th 2005, 08:21 PM
I would take as many econ, finance, and math courses as you can. You should definately plan on taking 2-3 semesters of calculus and atleast one class that is calculus-based probability. There are are also what is called VEE requirements and you should pick classes that will satisfy it. You can find all the info you need at this link

http://www.soa.org/ccm/content/exams-education-jobs/education-redesign/process-for-validation-by-educational-experience

That's about all i can help you with, good luck.


Thank you so much.

How many exam did you pass?

krzysio
April 27th 2005, 01:26 AM
You should review the site www.BeAnActuary.org very thoroughly.
It is probably not a good idea to go to a community college, but if you must, take as much mathematics as possible, and two semesters of accounting, if possible, to get it our of the way.

To have a reasonable chance to succeed as an actuary, i.e., pass exams, I would suggest that your SAT/ACT score should be in the top 20% overall, and top 5% in mathematics. This is a challenging profession. And exams are the hardest in existence in the universe.

Yours,
Krzys' Ostaszewski

AvonT
April 27th 2005, 07:05 PM
You should review the site www.BeAnActuary.org very thoroughly.
It is probably not a good idea to go to a community college, but if you must, take as much mathematics as possible, and two semesters of accounting, if possible, to get it our of the way.

To have a reasonable chance to succeed as an actuary, i.e., pass exams, I would suggest that your SAT/ACT score should be in the top 20% overall, and top 5% in mathematics. This is a challenging profession. And exams are the hardest in existence in the universe.

Yours,
Krzys' Ostaszewski


why 2 semesters or accounting rather than Econ??

Is that work if i study myself?

Quirk
April 29th 2005, 07:22 AM
I would suggest doing both economics and accounting courses as well as lots of mathematical based courses as possible. The accounting aspects will be very valuable when you are in the business environment especially if you were to have a rotation or position as a valuation actuary. It is better to learn the basics in school and build on the knowledge set through experience.

While I do feel it is importatnt to take many mathematics and economics courses, I would highly suggest taking courses in other disiplines as well for example, philosophy, english, or any other of the humanities. While this will not help so much on the long exam process, it will help with learning to relate to others and to develop other thinking processes that will be instrumental should you decide to be a consultant or a senior executive at a large company. Technical actuaries are good, but well rounded actuaries are far more valuable to a company. Some of the best actuaries I have ever worked with were individuals who I did not were FSA's and did not brag about their qualifications. There is something to be said about that.

AvonT
April 29th 2005, 07:26 PM
I would suggest doing both economics and accounting courses as well as lots of mathematical based courses as possible. The accounting aspects will be very valuable when you are in the business environment especially if you were to have a rotation or position as a valuation actuary. It is better to learn the basics in school and build on the knowledge set through experience.

While I do feel it is importatnt to take many mathematics and economics courses, I would highly suggest taking courses in other disiplines as well for example, philosophy, english, or any other of the humanities. While this will not help so much on the long exam process, it will help with learning to relate to others and to develop other thinking processes that will be instrumental should you decide to be a consultant or a senior executive at a large company. Technical actuaries are good, but well rounded actuaries are far more valuable to a company. Some of the best actuaries I have ever worked with were individuals who I did not were FSA's and did not brag about their qualifications. There is something to be said about that.

But i shoudl study math and econ in order to prepare and pass the SOA exam

Are you an actuary, what did you study in college

Quirk
May 25th 2005, 07:32 AM
I would highly suggest studying Math and Econ since it will be valuable for your exam preperation.

I am an actuarial student and I just wrote Course 6 to hopefully get my ASA (fingers crossed). I graduated a little over two years ago and I majored in Actuarial Science with a minor in economics, but most of my electives were in business, english, philiosphy, and writing courses.

bifodus
July 12th 2005, 04:03 AM
I would actually strongly recommend going to a community college. Those who knock it have most likely not tried it. It is an excellent way to get those general education classes out of the way before taking classes more relevant to your interests. In addition, you might find some teachers to be far more helpful and less arrogant than those at a university.

Also, don't fret the ACT/SAT if you haven't gotten as good of a score as you would have liked. Many people are late bloomers (myself included), and the type of math you will be doing while getting your degree (assuming you major in math or something similar) will be miles and miles ahead of high school math. These are good tests to statistically weed people out, but on an individual basis, they're close to meaningless once you've finished your first semester of college.

haaniya
February 18th 2006, 09:32 AM
wht are the p1 and fm2 exams?...and wen should one take them?

mallkins
February 18th 2006, 01:00 PM
I think if you are to plan ahead and try and be a leader in the field then you need to be well rounded as mentioned before.

In my opinion this should also include some top notch computer skills. Much of the modeling these days is done using computers, and a knowledge of how to do modeling, the principles of data mining, and database management as well as strong excel skills will be the icing on the cake for you as compared to someone else who has the same qualifications.

One of my friends (who is a FCAS) has just been promoted to Chief Underwriting Officer of one of the reinsurance companies down here. We had a discussion and he was quite frank that in the end the level of math that he does from day to day is not that high - certainly not up to the level of the exams - but his computer skills are what made the difference; and he considers himself not that strong on computers.

Ken
February 18th 2006, 01:33 PM
I think as you get higher up, soft skills are emphasized as you take on more of a management roll.

Sherylian
February 24th 2006, 08:09 PM
I would take the P Exam when I finish calculus-based probability course in college. Take the exam when those concepts are still fresh and after you study intensively. Be aware that the exam has more risk management concepts, instead of plain problems like finding the MGF for a distribution. I wouldn't worry about Exam FM untill I passed P exam first

Ken
July 16th 2006, 05:27 PM
At a university, your lower division courses are often in a lecture hall of 100+ students, and taught by a professor who is more interested in doing research than teaching.

Or taught by a grad student who may or may not have a firm grasp of the English language.