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Act18
April 28th 2005, 03:39 PM
Hi,

I have just started with kellison and saw that it has number of excercise problem which are of the type...Show that, proove that...and so on...Are we suppose to do such questions also ..or am i just wasting away time doing these proof questions. Does anybody has idea as to weather the questions in exam are numerical based or proof based or both ?

Thanks and gud luk to all...

wat
April 28th 2005, 04:00 PM
Hi,

I have just started with kellison and saw that it has number of excercise problem which are of the type...Show that, proove that...and so on...Are we suppose to do such questions also ..or am i just wasting away time doing these proof questions. Does anybody has idea as to weather the questions in exam are numerical based or proof based or both ?

Thanks and gud luk to all...

No proofs are required on the exam. It may help you to think in a certain way, but actually memorizing the proofs will not help. Almost all are numerical based - but there are some that will ask you to come up with an expression for a series of payments, and you'll need to pick the appropriate annuity symbol for the series.

Act18
April 28th 2005, 04:08 PM
Thanks for your promt reply...

Can i take this to mean that i neednt go through these problems?

Ken
April 28th 2005, 09:38 PM
I always think it's good to understand how these equations came about by understanding the derivations. You should also remember that since the questions are all multiple choice, it would be difficult to ask a tester to prove equations since the answer would always be given.

wat
April 29th 2005, 05:37 PM
Thanks for your promt reply...

Can i take this to mean that i neednt go through these problems?

If you have a manual, you should be brushing up on the notes and topics that are covered in it. Start getting very familiar with the notation.

However, if you don't have a manual, I'd start reviewing Kellison and get familiar with all the relationships that you see over and over (getting i(m) and d(m) quickly from i, annuity formulas, etc.).