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View Full Version : Dept of Labor Stats for Actuaries - make sense or comment on this?



Denny Crane
June 12th 2006, 04:10 PM
Anyone care to make sense or comment on the Dept of Labor stats for Actuaries.

Go to http://www.bls.gov/data/home.htm --> Occupational Employment Statistics --> Select any of the search types --> Select any of the georgraphical types --> scroll down and under the Computer and Mathematical Occupations you will see Actuaries

wat
June 12th 2006, 06:18 PM
Anyone care to make sense or comment on the Dept of Labor stats for Actuaries.

Go to http://www.bls.gov/data/home.htm --> Occupational Employment Statistics --> Select any of the search types --> Select any of the georgraphical types --> scroll down and under the Computer and Mathematical Occupations you will see Actuaries

Which statistic in particular caught your eye? Was it the mean?

Denny Crane
June 13th 2006, 01:28 PM
I was just trying to get a conversation going about how people felt about the results.

Irish Blues
June 13th 2006, 02:15 PM
You're gonna have to help here - I'm not sure what specifically (if anything) you're looking at.

wat
June 13th 2006, 02:17 PM
I was just trying to get a conversation going about how people felt about the results.

Well, I guess I'll address a few points.

1) For those out there that see this and go, "''', I'm way under the average of $90K! It's not even close to what that DW Simpson salary survey says!", you have to remember that for the most part, those without credentials are not actually "actuaries". Thus, I'd imagine that the $90K figure incorporates mostly credentialed actuaries.

2) Something possibly inconsistent with that is the 10%/25% figures, which stand at $45K & $57K, respectively. This seems low for someone with their ASA/FSA. On the other hand, one could be an ASA right out of college, and a lower income could reflect inexperience in the field. One is also considered an actuary if they are an EA, and I'm not sure how the pay scales go with that credential. Also, lower cost of living places probably pay lower wages, but it doesn't necessarily degrade the purchasing power.