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flyless
October 5th 2006, 02:20 PM
Dear all;

First, I'd like to say nice meeting all of you here~~~I just decide to take actuarial exams. I am now in graduate school and have attended several relevant classes in college.

Then, as far as I know, I should begin my work as following:
1. Take Exam P in 2007 Spring(BTW, when the on-line application begins?);
2, Take Exam FM later
3, apply for credit in VEE.(My graduate school has one course in this credit)


Am I right? Looking forward to all of you:)

flyless
October 5th 2006, 02:27 PM
Oh, BTW

I am still confused about the process of Actuaries Exams - EA-1, EA-2 A & B. When and why should we take them? After we have credit in VEE?

It would be really appreciated if you could help me on this!!!:Dizzy:

MathForMarines
October 5th 2006, 02:39 PM
Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I think the EA exams are for pension track ASA's to be become FSA's.

So, you should take them if your career field ends up in pensions after you become an ASA and are working on your fellowship, so if you are just starting it will be a few years down the road if you end up in pensions, and never if you don't.




Oh, BTW

I am still confused about the process of Actuaries Exams - EA-1, EA-2 A & B. When and why should we take them? After we have credit in VEE?

It would be really appreciated if you could help me on this!!!:Dizzy:

wat
October 5th 2006, 06:14 PM
Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I think the EA exams are for pension track ASA's to be become FSA's.

So, you should take them if your career field ends up in pensions after you become an ASA and are working on your fellowship, so if you are just starting it will be a few years down the road if you end up in pensions, and never if
you don't.

You're right in that EA exams are separate and not part of the ASA/FSA credentialing process.

However, there are individuals that are EA's but not ASA/FSA. I'm somewhat unfamiliar with the exact rules on how you get your EA, but it certainly is separate from getting your ASA. And they are specialized for pension actuaries only.

flyless
October 5th 2006, 08:35 PM
Oh.. Thanks for your reply...

I think that I have thought too far...It is better to concentrate on these two exams so far(P & FM)...

But there are only instructions for 2006. Am right to use 2006 version to prepare for the Spring/Summer 2007?

wat
October 6th 2006, 02:07 PM
Oh.. Thanks for your reply...

I think that I have thought too far...It is better to concentrate on these two exams so far(P & FM)...

But there are only instructions for 2006. Am right to use 2006 version to prepare for the Spring/Summer 2007?

Beginning in 2007, the following are requirements to get your ASA (become an Associate of the Society of Actuaries):

Exam P (Probability)
Exam FM (Financial Mathematics)
Exam MLC (Actuarial Models - Life Contingencies)
Exam MFE (Actuarial Models - Financial Economics)
Exam C (Construction and Validation of Actuarial Models)
VEE Statistics, VEE Economics, VEE Corporate Finance (Validation by Educational Experience)
FAP Modules 1-8 (Fundamentals of Actuarial Practice)
FAP Exam 1
FAP Exam 2/Final Assessment
APC (Associate Professionalism Course)

For FSA (Fellow), you'll need:

All ASA requirements
Exam DP (Design and Pricing)
Exam CSP (Company/Sponsor Perspective)
FSA Modules (2 of them)
Strategic Business Module - Project/Experience
FAC (Fellowship Admissions Course)

mathville
October 7th 2006, 09:58 PM
Do we need to have working experience to get an ASA or FSA?

wat
October 9th 2006, 01:49 AM
Do we need to have working experience to get an ASA or FSA?

For the ASA, it's technically a no (and I'm not sure about FSA), but most people are with an employer by then.

But no - there is no "x years minimum" experience requirement.