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rbailey
September 28th 2005, 01:23 PM
Are we allowed to discuss the questions on the exam tomm? Or is this never allowed? I personally thought I was prepared and I'm pretty confident that I passed but I'd like to get some feedback on some of the questions if that is allowed after today.

Did anyone else have a problem with it being computer based? I got to the exam site and my proctor tried to tell me I wasn't allowed to have a calculator, I had to show her where it said I was allowed to. Very frustrating, and the screen froze on me twice...I like the paper and pencil much better especially if we still do not get our scores for 6 weeks anyways.

wat
September 28th 2005, 01:29 PM
Are we allowed to discuss the questions on the exam tomm? Or is this never allowed? I personally thought I was prepared and I'm pretty confident that I passed but I'd like to get some feedback on some of the questions if that is allowed after today.

Did anyone else have a problem with it being computer based? I got to the exam site and my proctor tried to tell me I wasn't allowed to have a calculator, I had to show her where it said I was allowed to. Very frustrating, and the screen froze on me twice...I like the paper and pencil much better especially if we still do not get our scores for 6 weeks anyways.

You are allowed to discuss particulars about actual questions on the exam, but not until Thursday (tomorrow).

You are not allowed to reconstruct the exam in any way.

So, "What was the answer to that Pareto problem?" is allowed, but "#2 was the Pareto problem, #3 was the Binomial problem" is not allowed.

DVK916
September 28th 2005, 05:30 PM
You are allowed to discuss particulars about actual questions on the exam, but not until Thursday (tomorrow).

You are not allowed to reconstruct the exam in any way.

So, "What was the answer to that Pareto problem?" is allowed, but "#2 was the Pareto problem, #3 was the Binomial problem" is not allowed.


So did everyone take the same exam, or was the large pool of questions that were selected for each person.

wat
September 28th 2005, 07:05 PM
So did everyone take the same exam, or was the large pool of questions that were selected for each person.

I can't answer that accurately, but my guess would be that many, if not all, the questions were exactly the same for all the exams offered world-wide, but if they were offered in CBT format, they may have been scrambled around arbitrarily so as to minimize the chances of cheating. So maybe the same exam, but one person's #1 may have been someone else's #17.

ewr
September 28th 2005, 09:00 PM
A co-worker of mine and I both took the exam yesterday and I think we had 2 completely different exams. A few may have been the same, but from the questions that we discussed, they didn't overlap.

stillwater
September 28th 2005, 10:32 PM
A co-worker of mine and I both took the exam yesterday and I think we had 2 completely different exams. A few may have been the same, but from the questions that we discussed, they didn't overlap.

then how are they gonna grade the exam? As far as I know, for GRE, problems of different difficulty levels are weighed differently. If we don't get the same problems, then they shouldn't just use the # of correct problems as pass/fail criterion.

AJSeagles3
September 29th 2005, 06:01 AM
They probably tried to mix up questions of similar difficulties (and using similar methods to solve), but I do know that the exam is completely based on the number of questions you got correct.

BTW, I would like to share the question that stumped me the most whenever it is appropriate to do so. I STILL can't think of the best method to solve it.

AJSeagles3
September 30th 2005, 01:25 PM
They probably tried to mix up questions of similar difficulties (and using similar methods to solve), but I do know that the exam is completely based on the number of questions you got correct.

BTW, I would like to share the question that stumped me the most whenever it is appropriate to do so. I STILL can't think of the best method to solve it.

Following up...

My question was as follows:

Joint distribution: f (x,y) = 1/2, for 0 < |x| + |y| < 1; 0, for all other values of x & y.
It asked for the variance of something (y?), but I don't remember exactly. Basically, I haven't seen a range of values laid out like that. |x + y| is a different story than is |x| + |y|.

If someone could tell me the range over which I would have to integrate and why...