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Thread: PhD vs FSA

  1. #1
    Actuary.com - Level II Poster
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    PhD vs FSA

    I am preparing for MLC in May using, among other books, Models for Quantifying Risk 2nd eddition. I couldn't help but notice that Mr Richard London is an FSA but not a PhD and yet according to the back cover he has thought "at several universities". This makes me wonder if achieving FSA would qualify me for a university possition similar to that of a PhD.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    This is my first thread even though I've been using the exam forums here throughout my studies.
    I would like to thank everyone who contributes. You have been a great inspiration and a limitless resource.
    Thank you

  2. #2
    Actuary.com - Level VI Poster Ken's Avatar
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    Do you want to be guest teaching at several universities or do you want to be a fully tenured professor?
    Whether you are the lion or the gazelle, when the sun comes up, you better be running.

  3. #3
    Actuary.com - Level II Poster
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    I see your point.
    I'm not quite sure which one I might want to do yet. What are the qualifications for either?
    Last edited by mrsevansc; March 30th 2007 at 10:45 AM.

  4. #4
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    Ph.D. vs. FSA

    If you would like to have a full-time academic career and be a tenure-track professor, going for a doctorate (Ph.D.) would be a better bet.

    On the other hand, if you just want to give lectures on a sporadic basis then earning an FSA might be a better bet. Most FSAs work in industry or the government so if you want only a part-time academic career, going for an FSA is likely the better deal.

    Then again, if you wish to be a professor who specializes in teaching actuarial science then I would recommend that you go for both the Ph.D. and the FSA.

    Hey, can't go wrong in both. Right? :wink:

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MShanks74 View Post
    ...Then again, if you wish to be a professor who specializes in teaching actuarial science then I would recommend that you go for both the Ph.D. and the FSA.

    Hey, can't go wrong in both. Right? :wink:
    and by the time you finish you'll be well into your 30s

  6. #6
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    Actually, if you want a tenure-track professor position teaching actuarial science, a Ph.D. plus an ASA should suffice.
    Last edited by R_T; December 26th 2009 at 11:01 PM.

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